Immigration

The Sinking Ship

October 6th, 2010 9:54 pm  |  by  |  Published in Big Government, Health Care, Humor, Immigration, jobs, Obama, Politics  |  Comments Off

As high profile White House personalities like chief of staff Rahm Emanuel and chief economic advisor Larry Summers hog the spotlight as they leave the Obama administration at midterm, there are also lesser known, yet just as important, figures departing. They have toiled tirelessly in their positions but now merit nary a glance from the press as they exit through the wide White House doors.

For example, there is Albert Springwater, who is the president’s teleprompter cleaner. “It’s a very important job,” he says. “Without a clean and readable screen, the President might go from talking about oil drilling to reciting the Gettysburg Address. In fact, I let one of my assistants go the other day when, because of careless wiping, the president mistook the word ‘France’ for ‘Venezuela’ and threatened to put a sea blockade on Paris.”

But what really lured him away from his prestigious White House job? “There was an opening at Best Buy that I just could not ignore. Aisle after aisle of TVs waiting to be dusted off and sprayed with glass cleaner. How could I pass up an opportunity like that?”

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How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 21)

April 6th, 2009 1:03 pm  |  by  |  Published in Bailouts, Banking, Big Government, Civil Liberties, congress, Constitution, Debt, Economics, Education, energy, Environment, fascism, foreign aid, Foreign Policy, government spending, Gun Control, Health Care, Immigration, jobs, law, Liberty, Market Regulation, Maven Commentary, Politics, privacy, Social Security, Taxes  |  1

Wow, this one is a doozy!  A ton of new bills were introduced in Congress on Friday: 188 in total.  For those who haven’t read this series of articles from the beginning, there are a few things to keep in mind…

When taking a look at the list below, keep in mind that the U.S. Constitution, which created our Federal Government, clearly enumerated 18 specific functions that it is given.  For all other things, the 9th and 10th amendment make it clear that the individual states have the power.  Note that it states in the Constitution that it is the Supreme Law of the Land, which can be usurped by no other.  This means that all opinions to the contrary made by the Supreme Court are technically invalid.  Throughout the past couple of hundred hears the Supreme Court has rule one way or another on some “interpretation” of the Constitution, but in fact no interpretation is necessary, as the intention of the founding fathers are quite clear.  For example, if the “general welfare” clause or the “interstate commerce” clause was intended to be used as a catch-all for any arbitrary piece of legislation, then the 10th amendments which reads:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

would be completely meaningless.  So simple logic, in addition to the writings of Madison and other founding fathers, dictates the notion that the Federal Government was set up to have very little power, and that these United States are intended to be a loose federation of sovereign states.

Only due to politician’s greed and overwhelming desire for power does the Constitution get relegated to the trash heap.

So, despite the  noble intentions of many of these bills, it doesn’t mean they are legal.

No one is bound to obey an unconstitutional law and no courts are bound to enforce it.
– 16 Am. Jur. Sec. 177 late 2d, Sec 256

Of the bills introduced yesterday, these are ones that are clearly not legitimate functions of the Federal Government  [as always, my commentary will appear in red]:

  • HR1892 – To designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 102 North Main Street in Cedarville, Ohio, as the “William ‘Brent” Turner Post Office’.
  • HR1929 – To establish the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Investigative Commission to investigate the policies and practices engaged in by officers and directors at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac responsible for making the decisions that led to the enterprises’ financial instability and the subsequent Federal conservatorship of such enterprises.  [Keep in mind that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have been basically nationalized, which is, of course, unconstitutional.]
  • HR1925 – To designate as wilderness certain Federal portions of the red rock canyons of the Colorado Plateau and the Great Basin Deserts in Utah for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.
  • HR1924 – To amend the Indian Law Enforcement Reform Act, the Indian Tribal Justice Act, the Indian Tribal Justice Technical and Legal Assistance Act of 2000, and the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to improve the prosecution of, and response to, crimes in Indian country, and for other purposes.
  • HR1922 – To require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to hold at least 1 public hearing before issuance of a permit affecting public or private land use in a locality.
  • HR1921 – To establish an Office of Public Advocate within the Department of Justice to provide services and guidance to citizens in dealing with concerns involving the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and for other purposes. [Fantastic!  Create another layer of bureaucracy to help people deal with bureaucracy…]
  • HR1978 – To authorize the Attorney General to make grants to improve the ability of State and local governments to prevent the abduction of children by family members, and for other purposes.
  • HR1977 – To require the Consumer Product Safety Commission to study drywall imported from China in 2004 through 2007, and for other purposes.
  • HR332 – Providing that the House of Representatives will focus on removing barriers to a prosperous economy and therefore renew the dream.  [Reading the full text of the bill it all sounds nice, but it’s really nothing more than platitudes.  Nothing will come of this.  It’s not recommending anything concrete.]
  • HR1971 – To provide for the elimination of duties on certain comforter shells
  • HR1970 – To amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to exempt unsanctioned State-licensed retail pharmacies from the surety bond requirement under the Medicare Program for suppliers of durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS).
  • HR1969 – To promote freedom and democracy in Vietnam.  [Oh god. Oh god, no! Haven’t we gotten ourselves into enough jams with this interventionist crap?]

Read More »

How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 20)

April 2nd, 2009 10:08 pm  |  by  |  Published in Bailouts, Banking, Big Government, Civil Liberties, congress, Constitution, Economics, Environment, Foreign Policy, government spending, Health Care, Immigration, law, Liberty, Market Regulation, Politics, price controls, Social Security, Taxes  |  Comments Off

Yesterday in Congress, sixty-five new bills were introduced.  Due to recent controversy, and for those who start reading this series of articles in the middle, I will include the following boilerplate information in every article.

When taking a look at the list below, keep in mind that the U.S. Constitution, which created our Federal Government, clearly enumerated 18 specific functions that it is given.  For all other things, the 9th and 10th amendment make it clear that the individual states have the power.  Note that it states in the Constitution that it is the Supreme Law of the Land, which can be usurped by no other.  This means that all opinions to the contrary made by the Supreme Court are technically invalid.  Throughout the past couple of hundred hears the Supreme Court has rule one way or another on some “interpretation” of the Constitution, but in fact no interpretation is necessary, as the intention of the founding fathers are quite clear.  For example, if the “general welfare” clause or the “interstate commerce” clause was intended to be used as a catch-all for any arbitrary piece of legislation, then the 10th amendments which reads:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

would be completely meaningless.  So simple logic, in addition to the writings of Madison and other founding fathers, dictates the notion that the Federal Government was set up to have very little power, and that these United States are intended to be a loose federation of sovereign states.

Only due to politician’s greed and overwhelming desire for power does the Constitution get relegated to the trash heap.

So, despite the  noble intentions of many of these bills, it doesn’t mean they are legal.

Of the bills introduced yesterday, these are ones that are clearly not legitimate functions of the Federal Government:

  • S-759 – A bill to amend the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century to reauthorize a provision relating to additional contract authority for States with Indian reservations.
  • S-760 – A bill to designate the Liberty Memorial at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, as the “National World War I Memorial”.
  • S-761 – A bill to establish the World War I Centennial Commission to ensure a suitable observance of the centennial of World War I, and for other purposes.
  • S-762 – A bill to promote fire safe communities and for other purposes.
  • S-763 – A bill to amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, to authorize temporary mortgage and rental payments.
  • S-764 – A bill to amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, to increase the maximum amount of assistance to individuals and households.
  • S-769 – A bill to amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to improve access to, and increase utilization of, bone mass measurement benefits under the Medicare part B program.

Read More »

How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 19)

April 1st, 2009 4:32 pm  |  by  |  Published in Big Government, Civil Liberties, congress, Constitution, Education, Environment, Foreign Policy, government spending, Health Care, Immigration, law, Liberty, Market Regulation, Politics, privacy, Social Security  |  1

Yesterday in Congress, fifty-four new bills were introduced.  Due to recent controversy, and for those who start reading this series of articles in the middle, I will include the following boilerplate information in every article.

When taking a look at the list below, keep in mind that the U.S. Constitution, which created our Federal Government, clearly enumerated 18 specific functions that it is given.  For all other things, the 9th and 10th amendment make it clear that the individual states have the power.  Note that it states in the Constitution that it is the Supreme Law of the Land, which can be usurped by no other.  This means that all opinions to the contrary made by the Supreme Court are technically invalid.  Throughout the past couple of hundred hears the Supreme Court has rule one way or another on some “interpretation” of the Constitution, but in fact no interpretation is necessary, as the intention of the founding fathers are quite clear.  For example, if the “general welfare” clause or the “interstate commerce” clause was intended to be used as a catch-all for any arbitrary piece of legislation, then the 10th amendments which reads:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

would be completely meaningless.  So simple logic, in addition to the writings of Madison and other founding fathers, dictates the notion that the Federal Government was set up to have very little power, and that these United States are intended to be a loose federation of sovereign states.

Only due to politician’s greed and overwhelming desire for power does the Constitution get relegated to the trash heap.

So, despite the  noble intentions of many of these bills, it doesn’t mean they are legal.

Of the bills introduced yesterday, these are ones that are clearly not legitimate functions of the Federal Government  [as always, my commentary will appear in red]:

  • S-753 – A bill to prohibit the manufacture, sale, or distribution in commerce of children’s food and beverage containers composed of bisphenol A, and for other purposes.  [What’s the purpose of this?  There’s already S-593.  See my comments here about this issue.]
  • S-754 – A bill to provide for increased Federal oversight of methadone treatment/
  • HR308 – Honoring the life, legacy, and memory of Pedro Pablo Zamora y Diaz, an extraordinary educator and activist, and a pioneer in the battle against the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
  • HR309 – Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that North Korea should immediately stop any hostile rhetoric and activity towards the Republic of Korea and engage in mutual dialogue to enhance inter-Korean relations.
  • HR310 – Honoring the life of Coach Kay Yow in remembrance of her passing, and recognizing her dedication to the sport of basketball, her commitment to women and women’s health, and her contributions to the State of North Carolina.

Read More »

How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 18)

March 31st, 2009 4:22 pm  |  by  |  Published in Bailouts, Big Government, Civil Liberties, congress, Constitution, Economics, Education, energy, Environment, foreign aid, Foreign Policy, government spending, Immigration, Liberty, Market Regulation, Politics, Taxes  |  Comments Off

Yesterday in Congress, fifty-one new bills were introduced.  Due to recent controversy, and for those who start reading this series of articles in the middle, I will include the following boilerplate information in every article.

When taking a look at the list below, keep in mind that the U.S. Constitution, which created our Federal Government, clearly enumerated 18 specific functions that it is given.  For all other things, the 9th and 10th amendment make it clear that the individual states have the power.  Note that it states in the Constitution that it is the Supreme Law of the Land, which can be usurped by no other.  This means that all opinions to the contrary made by the Supreme Court are technically invalid.  Throughout the past couple of hundred hears the Supreme Court has rule one way or another on some “interpretation” of the Constitution, but in fact no interpretation is necessary, as the intention of the founding fathers are quite clear.  For example, if the “general welfare” clause or the “interstate commerce” clause was intended to be used as a catch-all for any arbitrary piece of legislation, then the 10th amendments which reads:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

would be completely meaningless.  So simple logic, in addition to the writings of Madison and other founding fathers, dictates the notion that the Federal Government was set up to have very little power, and that these United States are intended to be a loose federation of sovereign states.

Only due to politician’s greed and overwhelming desire for power does the Constitution get relegated to the trash heap.

So, despite the  noble intentions of many of these bills, it doesn’t mean they are legal.

Of the bills introduced yesterday, these are ones that are clearly not legitimate functions of the Federal Government  [as always, my commentary will appear in red]:

  • HCR89 – Supporting the goals and objectives of the Prague Conference on Holocaust Era Assets.
  • HCR86 – Authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall in the Capitol Visitor Center for the unveiling of a bust of Sojourner Truth.
  • HCR87 – Observing the 15th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide and calling on all responsible nations to uphold the principles of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.
  • HR298 – Congratulating the on-premise sign industry for its contributions to the success of small businesses.
  • HR299 – Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that public servants should be commended for their dedication and continued service to the Nation during Public Service Recognition Week, May 4 through 10, 2009, and throughout the year.
  • HR300 – Congratulating Camp Dudley YMCA of Westport, New York, on the occasion of its 125th anniversary.
  • HR301 – Honoring the life of Dr.John Hope Franklin

Read More »

How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 17)

March 27th, 2009 3:23 pm  |  by  |  Published in Bailouts, Big Government, congress, Constitution, Environment, Foreign Policy, government spending, Immigration, Liberty, Market Regulation, Politics  |  Comments Off

Yesterday in Congress, a whopping seventy-eight new bills were introduced.  Due to recent controversy, and for those who start reading this series of articles in the middle, I will include the following boilerplate information in every article.

When taking a look at the list below, keep in mind that the U.S. Constitution, which created our Federal Government, clearly enumerated 18 specific functions that it is given.  For all other things, the 9th and 10th amendment make it clear that the individual states have the power.  Note that it states in the Constitution that it is the Supreme Law of the Land, which can be usurped by no other.  This means that all opinions to the contrary made by the Supreme Court are technically invalid.  Throughout the past couple of hundred hears the Supreme Court has rule one way or another on some “interpretation” of the Constitution, but in fact no interpretation is necessary, as the intention of the founding fathers are quite clear.  For example, if the “general welfare” clause or the “interstate commerce” clause was intended to be used as a catch-all for any arbitrary piece of legislation, then the 10th amendments which reads:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

would be completely meaningless.  So simple logic, in addition to the writings of Madison and other founding fathers, dictates the notion that the Federal Government was set up to have very little power, and that these United States are intended to be a loose federation of sovereign states.

Only due to politician’s greed and overwhelming desire for power does the Constitution get relegated to the trash heap.

So, despite the  noble intentions of many of these bills, it doesn’t mean they are legal.

Of the bills introduced yesterday, these are ones that are clearly not legitimate functions of the Federal Government  [as always, my commentary will appear in red]:

  • HR293 – Commending Martin Brodeur of the New Jersey Devils for breaking the National Hockey League all time regular season wins record.  [I’m glad our “public servants” have nothing more important to do…]
  • SR86 – A resolution designating April 18, 2009, as “National Auctioneers Day”  [Are you kidding me?]
  • SR87 – A resolution expressing the sense of the Senate that public servants should be commended for their dedication and continued service to the Nation during Public Service Recognition Week, May 4 through 10, 2009.  [Oh, that is rich!]
  • HR1728 – To amend the Truth in Lending Act to reform consumer mortgage practices and provide accountability for such practices, to provide certain minimum standards for consumer mortgage loans, and for other purposes.  [There is already way too much red time when buying a house.  Whatever happened to caveat emptor?]
  • HR1729 – To amend the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 to provide for the treatment of institutions of higher education as voter registration agencies.
  • HR1730 – To amend the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 with respect to electric vehicle infrastructure.
  • HR1731 – To amend the Truth in Lending Act to require any creditor who transfers, sells, or conveys certain residential mortgage loans to third parties to retain an economic interest in a material portion of the credit risk for any such loan, and for other purposes.
  • HR1732 – To amend the Energy Policy and Conservation Act to provide for standards for energy efficient outdoor lighting.

Read More »

How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 14)

March 24th, 2009 4:28 pm  |  by  |  Published in Activism, Bailouts, Banking, Big Government, congress, Economics, Election, Federal Reserve, Free Market, government spending, Immigration, Liberty, Market Regulation, Politics, Taxes  |  Comments Off

Continuing our series on taking a look at the many bills that are introduced into Congress each day, yesterday was relatively light compared to previous days, with thirty-two new bills introduced.  The following are some that were obviously unconstitutional, or just plain asinine:

  • SR81 – A resolution supporting the goals and ideals of World Water Day.
  • HCR77 (also SCR12) – Recognizing and honoring the signing by President Abraham Lincoln of the legislation authorizing the establishment of collegiate programs at Gallaudet University.  [What?  A Congress in 2009 is giddy over some legislation from the mid 1800′s?]
  • HR274 – Expressing support for designation of March as National Nutrition Month
  • HR1676 – To prevent tobacco smuggling, to ensure the collection of all tobacco taxes, and for other purposes.  [The only reason people are smuggling tobacco products is because of the outrageous taxes on them.  Repeal all taxes and the black market will disappear.  Simple!]
  • HR1675 – To amend section 811 of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act to improve the program under such section for supportive housing for persons with disabilities.
  • HR1674 – To amend the National Consumer Cooperative Bank Act to allow for the treatment of the nonprofit corporation affiliate of the Bank as a community development financial institution for purposes of the Community Development Banking and Financial Institutions Act of 1994.
  • HR1673 – To amend the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 with respect to bonus payments.  [Add this one to the seven or eight other bills to do the same thing…]
  • HR1672 (also S-668) – To reauthorize the Northwest Straits Marine Conservation Initiative Act to promote the protection of the resources of the Northwest Straits, and for other purposes.
  • HR1671 – To understand and comprehensively address the oral health problems associated with methamphetamine use.
  • HR1670 – To amend title XIX of the Social Security Act to provide individuals with disabilities and older Americans with equal access to community-based attendant services and supports, and for other purposes.
  • HR1669 – To require the Secretary of the Treasury to establish a market for municipal securities, to require cooperation between the Secretary and the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in addressing the municipal securities market situation including through the establishment of municipal securities funding facilities, and for other purposes.  [The concept of municipal securities is unconstitutional, as well as the Federal Reserve Act (which created the Federal Reserve)…]
  • HR1666 – To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to establish an auction and revenue collection mechanism for a carbon market that ensures price stability with environmental integrity.
  • HR1664 – To amend the executive compensation provisions of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 to prohibit unreasonable and excessive compensation and compensation not based on performance standards.

Read More »

How is Congress spending its time — and your money? (Part 13)

March 20th, 2009 3:17 pm  |  by  |  Published in Activism, Bailouts, Big Government, congress, Constitution, Education, energy, Environment, foreign aid, Foreign Policy, Free Market, government spending, Health Care, Immigration, Individual Responsibility, Investing, law, Liberty, Market Regulation, Politics, Social Security, Taxes  |  Comments Off

The debauchery on Capitol Hill continues unabated, with an amazing ninety-three new bills introduced yesterday in Congress, many of which attempt to do the same thing.  How many of these bills do you think are Constitutional?  (Answer: very few).  Here are some of the worst:

  • HR1652 – To require institutions receiving certain assistance from the Troubled Asset Relief Program or the Federal Reserve to have employee bonus payment plans approved in advance of the payments being made.  [Each member of Congress must operate in a bubble, and/or they’re all hoping for the “credit” if their bill is passed.  This is at least the fifth bill on this subject in the past three days!]
  • HR1656 – To require TARP payments to be conditioned on the top 10 highest wage earners at a company having repaid any bonuses received during the previous 5 fiscal years.  [Six!  Ok, let’s review.  We have HR1542 by Rep. Carolyn Maloney [D-NY], HR1572 by Rep. Michael Thompson [D-CA]HR1582 by Rep. Steven LaTourette [R-OH], HR1603 by Rep. Charles Wilson [D-OH], HR1652 by Rep. Christopher Murphy [D-CT], and now this one from Rep. Dana Rohrabacher [R-CA].  Are these people working in a vacuum?  Could the process be any more inefficient?]
  • HR1650 – To enhance the oversight authority of the Comptroller General of the United States with respect to expenditures under the Troubled Asset Relief Program.  [Yet another TARP regulation bill.  The full text of the bill is not currently available, so I couldn’t tell if it specifically mentions employee bonuses so I could add it to the list above.  Why don’t these people just come out and admit that this TARP garbage is immoral an unconstitutional in the first place?]
  • S-651 – A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose an excise tax on excessive bonuses paid by, and received from, companies receiving Federal emergency economic assistance, to limit the amount of nonqualified deferred compensation that employees of such companies may defer from taxation, and for other purposes.  [Number 7, by Sen. Max Baucus [D-MT]]
  • HR1649 – To authorize the Secretary of Education to make grants to reduce the size of core curriculum classes in public elementary and secondary schools, and for other purposes.
  • HR1645 (also S-638) – To provide grants to promote financial and economic literacy.  [While I think it’s critical that people become more financially and economically literate, government should certainly not be the teacher, or else we’ll end up with more Keynesian nitwits that have destroyed our economy to date.  Rather, people can take Chris Martenson’s Crash Course for free, and read books like Hazlitt’s Economics in One Lesson and Tom Woods’ Meltdown.]
  • HR1643 (also S-648) – To amend title XVIII of the Social Security Act to establish a prospective payment system instead of the reasonable cost-based reimbursement method for Medicare-covered services provided by Federally qualified health centers and to expand the scope of such covered services to account for expansions in the scope of services provided by Federally qualified health centers since the inclusion of such services for coverage under the Medicare Program.
  • HR1642 – To provide loans and grants for fire sprinkler retrofitting in nursing facilities.
  • HR1641 – To amend the National Trails System Act to provide for a study of the Cascadia Marine Trail.
  • HR1640 – To amend the Truth in Lending Act to protect consumers from usury, and for other purposes.  [Caveat emptor.  The process of buying a home would be much quicker and hassle-free if not for the myriad of regulations and bureaucratic red-tape imposed by the federal, state, and local governments.]

Read More »

Ron Paul Shows Some Outrage (The Gaza Slaughter – Epilogue)

January 11th, 2009 9:53 pm  |  by  |  Published in Activism, Blowback, Civil Liberties, Commentary, Constitution, Foreign Policy, Immigration, Liberty, Philosophy, Politics, Ron Paul, terrorism, War  |  Comments Off

Congress votes (again) 390-5 to wholeheartedly condemn Hamas and support Israeli military aggression. “This is not in the interest of the United States; it’s not in the interests of Israel either.” – Ron Paul

by Jake, the Champion of the Constitution
Originally published Sunday, January 11, 2009 at http://www.nolanchart.com/article5782.html

WASHINGTON, DC – The House voted on Friday January 9th to pass House Resolution 34 which can be summed up with this short excerpt: The United States “calls on all nations to lay blame both for the breaking of the calm’ and for subsequent civilian casualties in Gaza precisely where blame belongs, that is, on Hamas.”

Um, I don’t think this will find much support from the peoples of “all nations.” Now, the firing of Hamas’ highly inaccurate rockets into civilian areas is to be condemned.  However, let us put things into some perspective here:

The Human Rights Watch reports that for 3 years from 2004-2007, ten (10) Israelis civilians were killed and zero (0) soldiers. Hamas rockets also killed two (2) Palestinian civilians as well. This latest attack was set off by the deaths of three (3) Israeli civilians and one (1) IDF soldier per the AP. So for 4 years, we have roughly (probably a few more) fourteen (14) Israelis dead and a couple Palestinians (most likely by mistake) by Hamas.

Read More »

Real ID, Redux?

January 7th, 2009 12:37 pm  |  by  |  Published in Big Government, Civil Liberties, congress, Constitution, Immigration, Liberty, Obama, Politics, privacy, REAL ID  |  Comments Off

We’ve dicussed the various threats that a national ID card would pose to our civil liberties, mostly with respect to the Real ID Act.  With Obama heading into the White House, the Democrat-heavy Congress has been busy introducing 350 new bills, one of which is a secure Social Security card (as reported by Jim Harper at the Cato Institute. Isn’t the Real ID bad enough?