Ron Paul talks with Alan Colmes on secession, piracy, torture memos and more

April 22nd, 2009 3:16 am  |  by  |  Published in Big Government, Civil Liberties, Constitution, Foreign Policy, Individual Responsibility, Liberty, Ron Paul  |  15 Responses

Ron Paul was interviewed by Alan Colmes on his radio show last night. They discussed Ron Paul’s recent comments regarding secession along with those of Texas Governor Rick Perry.

Once again Ron Paul hammers his talking points home during the interview. Linking the economic crisis with American empire and transitioning the secession talk into the drug war, using federal drug raids in California as an example.

It is fascinating to listen to Ron Paul work his left-right magic. He focuses on the Left’s talking points when on liberal radio and the Right’s points when on conservative radio stations. Many say that Ron Paul doesn’t play politics, but it is obvious he frames his words around the audience listening to him.

Listen to the entire interview in two parts below.

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Part 2

Responses

  1. yoikes says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 2:52 pm (#)

    "It is fascinating to listen to Ron Paul work his left-right magic. He focuses on the Left’s talking points when on liberal radio and the Right’s points when on conservative radio stations. Many say that Ron Paul doesn’t play politics, but it is obvious he frames his words around the audience listening to him."

    I disagree. Here is Ron Paul suggesting friendship with Chavez as well as free trade and travel with Cuba during the GOP hispanic debate: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6smh6Szy_CA

    Liberty is not a left (Democrat) vs right (Republicant) issue. Libertarianism is to statism as freedom is to slavery, so it is not surprising that the message of freedom has appeal beyond partisan politics.

  2. Libery Lover says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 5:35 pm (#)

    Ron Paul doesn't play politics or bow down to the republican party either. Do say that all Dem ideas are stupid or all Rep or Lib ideas are stupid is STUPID! :)

    Ron Paul takes good points from all sides.
    Most politicians are like a boss that doesn't listen to anyone and thinks that only HIS ideas are good.

    Open for debate and conversation is the way to go. GJ RON!!

  3. JTM says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:19 pm (#)

    "It is fascinating to listen to Ron Paul work his left-right magic. He focuses on the Left’s talking points when on liberal radio and the Right’s points when on conservative radio stations. Many say that Ron Paul doesn’t play politics, but it is obvious he frames his words around the audience listening to him."

    It's funny that you see it that way.

    The way I see it is "Liberty and Freedom" appeal to everyone, no matter the audience.

  4. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:20 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics, but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  5. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:21 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, outright lying, and tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  6. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:22 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, playing the fence, and tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  7. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:22 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, strattling the fence, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  8. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:22 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, strattling the fence, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  9. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:23 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, avoiding a stance, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  10. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:24 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, avoiding a stance, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can appeal to their bias on a given issue and be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  11. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:28 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, avoiding a stance, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can appeal to their bias on a given issue and be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. One thing I've seen him do often is leverage issues against each other to reveal inconsistencies. This is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  12. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 6:28 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say someone like Barack Obama or John McCain might play politics (misleading, avoiding a stance, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can appeal to their bias on a given issue and be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. One thing I've seen him do often is leverage issues against each other to reveal inconsistencies. Framing the conversation is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  13. hollering says:

    April 22nd, 2009 at 7:07 pm (#)

    I think the framing point is valid. It's not playing politics in the same sense as you would say that a typical politician might play politics (misleading, avoiding a stance, dodging questions, tit-for-tat, etc), but in framing the conversation for certain audiences, you can appeal to their bias on a given issue and be more effective in communicating an entire framework of thinking. One thing I've seen him do often is leverage issues against each other to reveal inconsistencies. Framing the conversation is what Ron Paul does so well, and the rest of the libertarian world could learn a lot from him.

    Great observation and commentary in my opinion.

  14. marcg says:

    April 25th, 2009 at 6:16 pm (#)

    Thank you… you hit my exact meaning….

    It's not playing politics like most play politics these days (changing positions), but rather emphasizing the portions of his beliefs that will resonate with his audience the most.

    Enjoy.

  15. Greg says:

    July 27th, 2009 at 2:20 am (#)

    I think it's weird how shallow — or maybe it's just dumb — Alan Colmes is. He shows an inability to hear a statement in the context of the particular argument. His arguments are one misinterpretation after another, and he no use for facts since his arguments are emotion-based and unsupported assertions.